Alexandra Lange
Architecture & design critic

“Women were unwelcome in architecture, but male architects couldn’t live without them”

Leonore Tawney at her loom (Courtesy MAD Museum)

The journalists, artists and curators at the press preview for the Museum of Arts and Design’s new exhibition, Pathmakers: Women in Art, Craft and Design, Mid-century and Today, were about 90 per cent female – an unusually high percentage, according to the museum’s publicist.

But the imbalance seemed about right, in that it reflected the continuing, uneasy, and gendered relationship between people who make things out of yarn, clay or cloth and people who make things out of glass, steel or plastic. The editors of a few blogs seemed unsure whether the contents of the show – four hanging woven-wire sculptures by Ruth Asawa, screen-printed geometric textile designs by Anni Albers, a test panel for the gold-embroidered tapestries for the Ford Foundation by Sheila Hicks, along with work by 39 other artists – even counted as “design” for their purposes.

“In the 1950s and 1960s, an era when painting, sculpture and architecture were dominated by men, women had extensive impact in alternative materials such as textiles, ceramics and metals,” reads the wall text.

Continues: Dezeen